Vandalism Act in Singapore

vandalism Act Singapore

Vandalism is governed by the Vandalism Act in Singapore. It is defined as the unauthorized;

  • Writing, drawing, painting, marking or inscribing on any public or private property, or
  • Affixing, posting up or displaying of any document on a public or private property, or
  • Hanging, affixing or displaying ay object from a public or private property, or
  • Stealing, destroying or damaging any public property.

A person convicted of vandalism is liable for

  • A fine of up to $2,000, or
  • Imprisonment of up to 3 years, and
  • 3-8 strokes of the cane

The punishment of caning is subject to Sections 325(1) and 330(1) of the Criminal Procedure Code. This means that women and men above the age of 50 shall not be caned. Also, no sentence of caning is to be executed in instalments.

Famous vandalism cases in Singapore include those involving foreign nationals Michael Fay and Oliver Fricker. Both were sentenced to jail and caning. You should consult an experienced criminal lawyer if you are facing criminal charges is Singapore.

For more information on the Singapore Criminal procedure, please visit www.singaporecriminallawyer.com

BEEN ARRESTED IN SINGAPORE?

GloriaJames-CivetttaWhat you need to know….

An arrest in Singapore can be made without a warrant, upon police reasonably suspecting a man of committing a crime.

You also need to know that a warrant may be issued to allow police to make an arrest for a normally non arrest able offense. For example, when a police report is made about a case of “voluntarily causing hurt”, the police will conduct investigations first before making any arrest. It is recommended that you hire an experienced criminal lawyer to guide and represent you, should you be charged with an offense.

On arrest, the accused may be searched. Women must be searched by a female officer.

IN THE POLICE STATION

You will be permitted to consult a criminal lawyer while under police custody, within a reasonable time. At this stage, family may also be contacted, provided that it does not hamper police with their ongoing investigations.

Police may detain the accused for 48 hours, but they can obtain a Magistrate’s order if they wish to extend custodial time in order to continue with investigations. The officer must tell the Judge the reason why you should be detained for a longer period. The judge will then consider the request before making a final decision.

If police do not wish to further detain you, you may me released on a personal promise or be placed on police bail.

Can i Remain Silent?

The accused has the right to remain silent but an adverse inference may be drawn and guilt may be inferred if the accused remains silent and does not state his defense.

When will I Be Charged in Court?

You may be charged in Court only after investigations have been concluded. Investigation is necessary to decide if there is any evidence of a crime having been committed by you. Investigation times can range from weeks, two months, depending on the nature of the crime. If you are charged, it is imperative that you seek legal representation form a criminal lawyer.

what are the powers does an investigating officer have?

  • To order a person to go to a police station or other place for questioning and for taking of a statement;
  • To record what you have to say and ask you to sign it;
  • To search a place and take away things to be used as evidence;
  • To seize properties which may be exhibits in a case?

FOR MORE INFORMATION OT THE ARREST PROCEDURE IN SINGAPORE PLEASE VISIT WWW.SINGAPORECRIMINALLLAWYER.COM

Should you have any questions or need legal representation, kindly contact Gloria James-Civetta & Co on 6337-0469 for a free consultation, or email to consult@gjclaw.com.sg

Duties of a Criminal Lawyer in Singapore

criminal lawIn Singapore, Criminal lawyers carry the responsibility of representing persons who have been convicted of a crime. It is their duty to ensure that their client, guilty or not, get just and fair treatment under Singapore law.

The lawyer is their client`s voice when appearing before a judge. It is therefore very important that the criminal lawyer understand the law and any grey areas that accompany it so they can best represent their clients.

What to Take Into Consideration

You should take your time and research potential criminal lawyers by doing a simple internet search. From here you should be able to come up with a shortlist of lawyers who are suitably qualified to represent you in court.

An experienced will explain the law to you and recommend a clear plan to action. Your lawyers should be experienced in the field that you require and have the necessary representation and communication skills required to argue your case in the courtroom.

Good criminal lawyers will make themselves available to you in order for you to stay informed about any developments in your case. They understand your anguish.

What to Ask Your Lawyer

Before seeing your criminal lawyer you should write down a brief summary so that you lawyer can understand the nature of your criminal charges. Some points to write down are:

  • Date and time of the arrest
  • The circumstances leading to the arrest
  • What you are being accused of.
  • Who was involved and were there any witnesses?
  • What the charges against you are

Any documentation or information that can help your case should be forwarded to your criminal lawyer so that they can formulate the best course of action when representing you.

Should you have any questions or need legal representation please click here.

Hire Top Lawyer to Tackle Cases Easily

top Singapore law firmsIn the business world, one has to be very careful while taking important decisions. Your one reckless decision can cost the reputation of the business as well as the cost of the business. Singapore has been known to provide amazing opportunities for the business houses to succeed and generate high finances contributing in the country’s GDP. Even after being supportive for the business growth, Singapore has certain rules and regulations which are a must for business houses and small businesses to follow. If they will not follow them as per the law, they might be charged with penalty or punishment.

Under these circumstances the business houses and international companies are the major ones to face penalties and charges in Singapore due to the lack of proper knowledge about the law. If you are one of them or are thinking about starting a business in Singapore, top Singapore law firms are here to help you in the process. The top law firms have the best lawyers known in Singapore, experienced and well versed about the business law, civil laws applicable on all kinds of businesses, monitory investment and business licensing. Read more…

When you represent yourself in a Criminal Trial

Crimes are pernicious tonics that leave people indifferent and cold for a lifetime. When you are one of those who are accused of certain crimes, you too have all the legal rights. One of those is to hire the best lawyer in town and you can go through the entire process – from random questioning through the end of the trial – only if you want one. In case you don’t want an attorney, you certainly have all the rights to represent yourself and your case.

 Called as appearing “pro se” or “pro per,” means you are representing yourself, which actually means you need to invest your time to understand criminal law in Singapore and then do whatever a lawyer is supposed to do to protect all your rights. So before you go any further with your decision, consider what it really means and how things actually work.

Why People Actually Represent Themselves?

People choose to represent themselves for a variety of reasons and other logics that come in their ways. Few think that they would be more successful than someone else who isn’t aware of all the facts of their case. Others also represent themselves since they think they won’t qualify for a non-cost, court-appointed attorney, but they just don’t want to hire one at their own expense. And others just don’ trust lawyers for their case. Read more…